5 million DKK granted for project regarding the significance of the informal health sector – University of Copenhagen

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23 April 2018

5 million DKK granted for project regarding the significance of the informal health sector

Professor Tine Gammeltoft has received a grant of 5 million DKK from Danida for a research project that will examine the role of the informal health care system for diabetes patients in Vietnam.

A change in living habits among people around the globe means that we are witnessing an explosive increase in cases of non-communicable diseases such as cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Every year, 15 million people between 30 and 69 years die as a result to these types of diseases. More than 80 % of the deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries.

A new interdisciplinary project led by Professor Tine Gammeltoft will look into the significance of the informal health sector for managing the epidemics of non-communicable diseases. Despite strong evidence of the significance of social support in relation to people’s general health, there is very limited knowledge about the nature of and potential of informal types of support for people suffering from non-communicable diseases, especially in low- and middle-income countries. That is what this new project has to offer.  

Strengthens research collaboration

The project is based in Vietnam and is an interdisciplinary collaboration between the Department of Anthropology, Global Health Section (KU / SUND), the University of Southern Denmark, the Thai Binh University in Vietnam, the Ministry of Health in Denmark and Vietnam and Novo Nordisk.

Besides creating new information about the role of the informal health sector, the project also aims to develop new methods that can improve the ability of diabetes patients to live with their illness in their daily lives. In addition, the project will strengthen the research collaboration in the field between Denmark, Vietnam and Novo Nordisk and test new forms of public-private cooperation on health research and efforts to improve health in transition countries.

The project is supported with 5 million Danish kroner by Danida and runs until 2021.